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Posted on: February 2, 2013 1:26 pm
 

non-prose

21st Century

 

perceptions formed from

diodes’ highly defined light

infinite arrays shrunk thin, thinner

in fact,…airtight

 

broadly banded tentacles

searching with wireless fidelity

harvesting crops of zombies

behind the shades of the uncommunity

 

flushed down the transient gyre

of virtuality

into the pixilated sewer

which waits for you and me

 

Posted on: January 7, 2012 1:15 pm
Edited on: January 11, 2012 12:06 pm
 

How did we get here? What's next?

The plutocrats have by now sucked the air out of the Amerikan economy.

Will the dying(†) embers reignite, and what colours the flame?


 (†) The author wishes to acknowledge the suggestion contributed by the ashwhole screen-named SchteemeyCaca
Posted on: July 5, 2010 12:35 pm
 

Write like Kerouac...

...and I really dig that recliner, but it's damn near impossible to build motivation enough to get up out of it, to the extent that I'm in it all afternoon, even into the evening on some days, having first stocked up on plenty of Scotch with a pile of fresh Depends neatly stacked on the side, next to the draw string garbage bag, a strategy I learned the long, hard, dirty way...and, you know, checking out the channel guide, and picking the least obnoxious game of the moment, setting the Dolby receiver and the little infrared receiver that takes orders from the tiny remote I plug into my iPod with its 14 gigs of all my favorite music, because I know for sure that after eleven minutes (tops) of listening to the game commentators that sound like braying donkeys, but not as smart, or the infinite commercials yacking about trucks with "hemis", whatever the phluck hemis are, that I'll switch my ears over to Schubert's Death and the Maiden or some good old Savoy Brown (probably I can't get Next to You , if I know me, which I certainly do)... and I remember once, and this was in the early days before I had the system worked out to perfection, when I had to get up off the recliner and adjust the angle of the HiDef monitor, and wasn't that  a humiliating pi ss off, making me feel like an inferior fool, but, in reality it served it's purpose allowing me to go out to the kitchen for that ziplock with the nearly whole, left--over roasted chicken and a roll of paper towels, and certainly making for some real belly laughs later when I drunkenly hefted garbage bag full of messed Depends mixed with chicken bones and greasy paper towels, and threw it into the garbage can, under the amazing light of an old time full moon, outside...I was outside in the relative wilderness of my back yard, a freaky feeling, and don't think that I didn't thank god for the glaring halogens in my motion detector, security floodlights, or I'd have been out there in the dark, surrounded by all this natural shi t, like who really knows?...maybe moths, insects, tiny little mammals like voles, you know...
Category: NFL
Tags: iPod, Jack, Kerouac, voles
 
Posted on: April 18, 2010 3:58 pm
 

Southern cuisine

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pac
ific/8627335.stm


An Australian publisher has had to pulp and reprint a cook-book after one recipe listed "salt and freshly ground black people" instead of black pepper. Anyone know where you can get a people grinder? My wood chipper is way too noisey for dining.

Category: General
Posted on: February 24, 2010 10:24 pm
Edited on: January 7, 2012 2:31 pm
 

Atheists are lightweight punks.

Atheists don't believe in any form of god. Yet they believe that their football team, their neighborhood, their families and all their other delusions are real.

I don't believe that anything is real, meaning that nothing whatever exists outside of my mind's eye (my personal perceptions), especially you.

Do not think that because I seem to have deliberately and precisely arranged the pixels on my monitor to form these "words", that I believe that my monitor actually exists, because I'm sure that it doesn't. This in no way bothers me.

I'll also arrange some other pixels for the edification of you "others": http://www.davidhume.org/



Posted on: February 16, 2010 12:27 pm
 

Hurry up science

In time Science will likely reveal that...

...but nobody hold their breath.

For example, the last greatest thing was the Human Genome Project. Government and private labs all over were determining the sequence of the nitrogenous bases in bits and pieces of human DNA. Then they compared the sequence of their piece of DNA with sequences of others' pieces, found overlaps and, thereby, merged the sequences so as to learn bigger and bigger stretches. That process required the formation of The Internet. By now, they know the entire sequence of all the DNA in humans.

This was tauted to launch a New Medicine that could "cure" human pathologies by the thousands.

OK, but most of human DNA is "non-sense", or not-genes. So they had to find the "good stuff", the genes, which indirectly produce our traits by providing information for cells to make proteins. The proteins actually "do" our lives. But many genes are scattered here and there among all the DNA. So it's kind of like cutting a needle into hundreds of pieces, and throwing the pieces into a gigantic haystack. Then you have to find all the pieces in the haystack and reassemble the needle.

Even when a gene is determined, mostly they don't know what the protein it codes for does in the cells. Working this out is much more difficult than sequencing the gene in the first place. Way beyond that, is the problem that most proteins work together with many other proteins to produce their effects, like team sports. So knowing what a certain protein does in isolation is often not very useful. To complicate these little difficulties, genes get switched on and off in an individual depending on the person's developmental stage, and also on signals from the internal and external environment. So the proteins take turns doing their work kind of like line shifts in a hockey game.

So what we've ended up with is like a book written in an unknown language, and the letters of the book have been scrambled just for fun. Basically all we know is that the title of the book is: How to Produce a Human, Live its Life, Get Sick (and maybe recover), Make Kids, Get Old and Die.

Meanwhile, the economy has been souring like an old box of wine in a corner of a self-storage shed, so far less money is available to pursue the almost impossible research, and people are texting each other on Blackberries, or playing games on PlayStation instead of learning stuff at school.

Me, I take vitamin C for some unknown reason, and it seems not to hurt me too much (so far).
Category: General
Posted on: February 12, 2010 10:26 pm
 

The personal cost of our present economic slump

This article captures what JudgementDay foresaw and said now almost two years ago:

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/2010
03/jobless-america-future


It's a long article, and no fun whatever to read. Pour yourself a stiff drink...

I think whatever truth there is in the ideas is clearly evident just by reading the comments on these boards.
Too bad there's no god, because one sure would be nice.
Category: General
Posted on: January 12, 2010 2:48 pm
Edited on: January 16, 2010 2:38 pm
 

Where did that gene come from?

The following report provides evidence that viruses enslaved by ancient animals permitted mammals to evolve. That's us. Viruses are our friends. A gene we borrowed from them is essential for placentas to form properly, and, therefore, for us to successfully make babies.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/12/s
cience/12paleo.html?pagewanted=1


What's your favorite virus anecdote?

Category: General
 
 
 
 
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